EXERT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Sunday, February 12, 2012

Another Change of Heart


It was right after the Buffs stormed the little village that I realized that my fears were right, I was playing and modifying the wrong set of rules. This wasn't really a MacDuff game, it was a Hearts of Tin game. Now I'm really glad I didn't rewrite MacDuff before playing!

Luckily I can play HofT without actually gluing the figures to bases so I switched rules mid game and got 1 turn of modified HofT before having to attend to other things. Hopefully I'll finish up tomorrow  and have a look-see at HofT to see what changes would be needed.  One thing already decided on is a slight increase in the number of hits per stand to 2,3 or 4 depending on quality vs the current 1,2, or 3 .
A HofT Game of the Week from 2008

I'm not quite sure what this means for my armies. As mentioned, I don't need to put troops on bases to use HofT though with even this many troops on table, it wouldn't hurt. It would be tempting to go back to where I started 3 years ago with the 1812 and 1837 Rebellion and Texas figures based singly and organized into companies for MacDuff  while the Indian service troops go onto bases and get organized into battalions for HofT. Now that I know that I can work the Scruby and homecast figures on a 15mm frontage whether on single  or multiple bases, the pressure to go all one way or the other is off. .

So basically, troops in shakos, Indians and American/Canadian militia types fighting amongst woods and farms. Troops in forage caps, esp with curtains, fighting in a drier climate with adobe houses. It may be time to revisit those other Indians after all or maybe just invent those indigenous Atlantican armies.


4 comments:

  1. Hi Ross,

    Forgive this question, if you need to, but would you mind stating what you perceive to be the key distinction(s) between a "MacDuff game" and a "Hearts of Tin game?"

    I'm very, very interested, but to be honest it's sometimes hard to follow the evolutions of your rule sets, and the thoughts that went into each change. I've become a bit lost, I'm afraid.

    I ask because, as you may know, I'm planning to start games in my own fictional setting soon. I'd thought to use Hearts of Tin, but have enjoyed a game or three of MacDuff (using the original version I found printed in The Courier many years ago) too. I'd love to make an informed choice as a starting point, and so would like to know the salient features that make up a game played with each, if you'd be so kind.

    Thank you!

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    1. Will, I hope this morning's post answers the question. But feel free to ask if not.

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  2. I believe that one of the basic differences is that MacDuff is intended for individual figures; while HofT uses stands of figures.

    I think that they are also geared toward different periods and somewhat different scales (of the action) . . . but like you, Will, I've become confused trying to keep them separated in my head, so I'll allow Ross to actually explain the differences.


    -- Jeff

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