EXERT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Friday, March 16, 2012

Prototypes (amended)



The first almost complete casts are out of the latest mold, a US militiaman in smock and round hat and a sailor. Not the best job I've ever done turning a master into castings but not the worst either since it looks like they are usable even if needing to be replaced. After 30 minutes of testing and venting I have a produced a couple of almost complete castings but each will require about 5 minutes work to clean them up never mind lost detail, (in addition to the detail lost to the lighting) no bayonets, missing chunks of hat brim, etc. At least they have arms now!  The sailor is open handed and can take a musket or artillery implements or just run around crewing things.

I was wondering  how many people would question the ability of the wagon to survive having the mortar fire. (1.5 so far is the latest count I think **** This comment is not intended to imply that anyone has been in the slightest negative or less than positive and supporting, Just the opposite in fact***)   I'm sure there must be a steam punk explanation, some sort of steam-hydraulic shock absorber thing mounted underneath where you can't see it, but on the other hand it belatedly occurred to me that I could probably turn spare 25mm barrels into 40mm swivel guns which is more what I envisaged originally. That would also answer the question of what the sockets are for.

18 comments:

  1. Good looking figures.
    I never actually questioned the feasibility of your wagon, I just assumed it worked at some intersection of history and whimsy, but maybe that is just another way of saying steam punk?

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    1. Padre, I hope you will forgive my clumsiness,in the light of morning, that was badly worded on my part.

      First I hadn't meant to seem to accuse anyone of anything even vaguely negative, everyone has been very positive and supportive.

      Secondly, I hadn't thought that you in particular had referenced it's viability, but that is one of the problems with such vague statements in a public forum.

      I think you are right about the intersection of whimsy and history/technology but its all new territory to me.

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  2. great vehicle well made - looking forward to seeing it in action...

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  3. Wow, that's an awsome piece of kit!
    Best wishes, Brian

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    1. Brian when it gets into action we'll see if its awesome or awful!

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  4. Ross Mac,

    I think that the figures look great ... and I am sure that they will have lots of uses, especially the sailor.

    I look forward to seeing these in action soon.

    All the best,

    Bob

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    1. Thanks Bob I think the sailor has lots of potential, I may need to redo the mold though, I like figures I can pop out and paint.

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  5. The feasibility if the thing was a concern - but is outtweighed by it looking cool!

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  6. I love the models, and the steam mortar is great, though I did worry about its recommended duty cycle. I discussed it with my 9-year-old son, who keeps me straight on stuff like this. If it fires, the carriage will disintegrate, we thought. No - it's OK - the wagon probably has a solid iron flat-bed - that'll sort it. What about the wheels, then? Iron wheels, obviously. That's it, then - no problem.

    Super models, as ever - I'd love to be able to master my own figures. I keep thinking I'll have a go, but I had a go nearly 40 years ago, and the results were unspeakably poor.

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    1. Ah, there's my problem, I didn't have a 9 yr old to discuss it with.

      I was pretty poor when I tried 40 years ago too. Not pretty anymore though.

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  7. Thanks Tim but I still wish I thought of the 25mm guns as swivels idea 2 days ago as they would make it more tank-like and swivels were typical armament for North American schooners and launches.

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  8. I figured good solid American Oak (as in western hemisphere). If cannon balls can bounce of, what's a mortar or two. Actually gave more thought to wind and baloons.

    Thanks

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    1. Ah, the balloon is tethered to a heavy wagon which is anchored, if unthethered, it goes where the wind blows. If you want to move it, you need to descend, then pack up the wagon.

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  9. Regarding swivels, light breech-loaders were known and used since the Middle-Ages. I believe the pierriers, the swivels of 18th C. French Navy, where of this type, and de Saxe's Amusettes certainly where.

    A heavy mortar raises a lot of difficult questions, but what about a light caronade, howitzer or 'secret howitezr' grenades thrower in front, probably behind a mantlet? Recoil of Navy pieces, even the heaviest ones, was restricted with ropes (and having them sliding rather than on a wheeled carriage); could be substituted with a coehorn mortar for some missions. A caronade with a few swivels was rather typical of late 18th c. / early 19th C. light gunboats.

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  10. I did think of a petard and of a caronade, unfortunately my skills at forging such things is nil so I have to rely on what I can scrounge. The 30mm canon I found this morning are a bit big for swivels but they'll do.

    I'm just glad I didn't see a picture of an amphibious steam wagon proposed in 1809.

    A mantlet would have been good but the MK2 mobile battery crew will have to get by with ducking.

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  11. "an amphibious steam wagon proposed in 1809.": exciting for a Lacepunk fan!
    The Amphibolos, maybe? Could have easily be turned into an amphibious assault vehicle.
    Related design from there :)

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    1. I believe that it is it, 1805 I see not 09 but close enough. With a drawing being published in a Boston Journal in 1834 it would have been ideal for an 1839 War in Maine, right next door. But 1 device is already stretching my horizons, wouldn't want the elastic to snap!

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