EXERT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Look out Tom, here comes Jack

We were supposed to get more snow today, and we did get a smatter but by lunchtime the sun was shining. None the less, I had promised myself a "snow day", retired or not and no such detail was going to rob me!

Not being in the mood to paint I set to work on the 4.7". Having destroyed an old Tamiya 25 pounder and a $ store Marx ripoff howitzer without being quite satisfied, I was forced to fall back on my initial idea of wood dowelling.

A coat of paint and this 4.7" naval gun on improvised field carriage will be all set to take on that Oerberg Long Tom, once I build it...

I  have heard that planning, patience and precision are useful assets in making a model but alas none of the hobby stores stock any of these. Luckily I am easily pleased and the vague suggestion + glossy paint seems to work well. In other words, none of the detail is quite right but I am extremely pleased so far.

From Wikipedia 
"Joe Chamberlain" at Magersfontein from the Wikipedia article on the 4.7"


If all goes well I'm off to WWII North Africa  tomorrow (on Ron's game table that is if any govt agencies are monitering this) but I expect to be applying paint by the weekend.

Again from Wikipedia. I knew some 4.7's on an improved wooden carriage were used in Africa during WW1 but I didn't realized that they were used in small numbers in France, here by Canadian gunners. The carriage is the new metal version which is closer to the original Britain's model used by HG Wells, apart from the wheels. Luckily I didn't notice the picture until I was too far in to start over. Maybe later.

22 comments:

  1. That is looking really good, the 4.7" naval gun is the quintessential "toy" gun in my opinion.

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    1. I had meant to raise the gun up slightly but there it is. ... I quite agree on the quintessential aspect, had to have on for my 40s.

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  2. I think it will serve quite nicely, Ross. It's a rather uncomplicated looking gun and you have replicated it effectively. I look forward to seeing it painted.

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    1. Thanks Steve, The proof will be in the painting.

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  3. Yeah, looks like good piece of work to me!

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  4. A great start,I look forward to seeing paint on it.

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  5. Nice start and great historical photos!

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    1. Thanks,I was really happy and surprised to find so many early photos (there are more)

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  6. Great looking gun - I admire your ingenuity , Tony

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  7. Ross Mac,

    If it looks like a 4.7 and goes 'Bang' like a 4.7 ... then it's a 4.7!

    To me I don't think that you could have made a better representative wargaming model of a 4.7. My only question is ... are you going to make a 12-pounder to go with it?

    All the best,

    Bob

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    1. Bob, we will have to wait to see if it goes 'bang'. No plans for a naval 12pdr.

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  8. Magnificent job with the gun, you have given me a good idea for my WWI scenarios, thank you very much. Now the problem is to find the time ... that to me is an impossible mission. Best regards from distant Argentine Republic. Carlos

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    1. Gracias Carlos. I will watch to see what that scenario is!

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  9. Excellent Idea and Capitol Building of the 4.7inch- certainly going to look super once painted and finished. What have You employed for the Wheels Ross? Regards. KEV.

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    1. Thanks Kevin, I'm not exactly sure what the wheels were made from. I noticed it in the drawer while looking for something else. Might have been a very small container, about 7mm+ deep or maybe 2 lids from a vial or bottle of some sort . In anycase this gun will be one of a kind!

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  10. The wheels look just the thing - nicely done!!

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  11. I dunno Ross, i turn my back for a few days and then you go and comeup with something like this.

    Well done and very nice.

    Now you just need to cast it and pack a few off to Kev.

    (tongue in cheek)

    Greg

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