EXERT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Ubique

Everywhere.

I'm not sure if the Royal Artillery's motto and Battle Honour was granted to Indian mountain batteries as it was to the RCA but this winter it seems to apply to ice and snow.

Today the 40mm Toy Soldiers of the 1st Koolahat Battery reenacted the epic feat of dragging the guns of the 1st Kashmir artillery over the snow covered Shandour Pass in the Hindu Kush during the Rlief of Chitral. See Blackwood Tales from the Outpost II for an account by the young English officer on command of the guns.
This snow is of course my excuse for not getting more painting and gaming done this winter. Battle report on the current suspended game probably Friday then a NQSYW remote player game on Sunday.

A print of the real thing from the British Battles article on the Relief.




27 comments:

  1. Any sign of a thaw? We are starting Spring here in the west of England and have been very lucky to avoid all extreme weather this winter.

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    1. There has been warmth in the sun for 2 weeks now and melting a plenty in between the semi-weekly snowstorms. I think the crocus (croci?) will be late.

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  2. I always thought the Royal Artillery's motto Unique meant "all over the place"
    I do not envy your snow!
    Simon

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    1. Like my dice.

      I don't envy our snow either, it doesn't have long to be.

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  3. I'm not sure who is hardier, the toy soldiers or their CO. You still have a lot of snow there by Ontario standards. Here in Kitchener-Waterloo we are just starting to see patches of lawn emerge. My wife and I have been starting to question the wisdom of our plans to retire in the Annapolis Valley after watching your last few winters!

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    1. We still have a lot of snow left by Nova Scotia standards! But don't worry, after 35 years of observation there appears to be roughly a 7 year cycle with cold and snowy at one peak, exceptionally mild and rainy at the other and a waxing or waning gradient on the inbetween years.

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  4. That is fantastic, I have seen a sand table but a snow table looks so much more practical and impressive. You just need thick gloves and hope the midday sun stays well covered. I should start painting WW1 Austrians and Italians ready for next year.

    Our crocus are just finishing and I am waiting a few more weeks for the tulips.

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    1. Yes I could get into this John, the 20mm plastic wouldn't sink in like individual 40mm metal ones. I should deploy my RCW troops on the flat area. Then there is Alexander Nevski's Battle on the Ice. I could set out a large tray of water, let in freeze a little, deploy plastic Russians and metal Teutonic Knights. Probably best to video tape that one.

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  5. 18c in Tokyo today Im not homesick for snow

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    1. I'm just glad we're pretty much done with -18!

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  6. A most excellent diorama Sir! I don't think that I have seen quite such realistic snow for some time ;-)

    Kind regards, Chris.

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    1. Thanks I've put hours of work into it over the last 2 months...

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  7. Spring has sprung here in the Duchy of Tradgardland although it has been very cold of late.
    The amount of snow in your photo looks incredible. I find it hard to imagine what all that amount falling must look like.

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    1. Alan, it doesn't come down all at once. It usually looks pretty much like any snowfall but when storms last for 12 - 18 hours and come 3 days apart for a month well, it adds up.

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  8. Amazing snow, Ross! Even better than your new gridded board.

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    1. Still I'm thinking of repainting it green in a month or 2.

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  9. Hi Ross- what a huge fall of Snow...I cannot imagine what it would be like to go through one of Your Winters - I've never seen Snow....I'll guess it is cold and hard and does not seem to melt easily until Spring. KEV.

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    1. Kev, not at all, ice is hard and the snow can get a hard crust in some circumstances, but often around here. Most of it is as fluffy as it looks. I waded around to the back of the house up to my waist and occasionally my chest.

      Also melts well once the temperature gets anywhere near the freezing mark as the sun is high in the sky as spring approaches. For the last 2 weeks its been melting steadily inbetween storms and that will speed up now. Of course when it melts it turns into water and has to go somewhere, especially until the ground thaws.......

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    2. Thanks Ross - often wondered about Snow- sounds like You have waded through up to Your chest like we do here in the Surf....when it is "fluffy" - it must not weigh much....sounds marvellous- for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day it must be a real treat. KEV.

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    3. Kev, yes when it arrives when its very cold out and is fluffy it doesn't way much but when it's compressed or wet it can collapse roofs.

      A light snow flurry on Christmas Eve is very scenic. Aĺl our early snow had melted though and so with bare tree limbs and frozen ground it was a "green" (or brown") Christmas this winter. About even odds here.

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