EXERT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Saturday, October 1, 2016

Doing' The Victory Two Step

This evening I made it to an all sorts of games day in Kentville where Jeff (armchair commander blog) was hosting another epic (ie multiplayer) C&C ancients game.

I hate to admit it but that was a satisfying way to end a game!
I took the Carthaginian right wing in a Punic Wars battle in Spain.  Little bit of cavalry and light infantry skirmishing, a bit of trash talk and then, when eventually  threatened by a serious attack, a dashing counter attack with Ellie as the star. After a little softening up by various light troops she went in and stomped a darned good roll wiping out some Hastati and then rolling a Helmet to add the General and coincidentally bring the Roman forces to defeat. The bulk of the fighting and dying was done in the centre and left  but I am pleased to note a 5:2 kill ratio on my flank as my share in a hard fought, close, battle.  

The calm before the storm.

Of course even better than the victory was just getting out and enjoying good company and a good game. Thanks to Jeff for the invite and the game,

9 comments:

  1. Ross, I note a few bases have a green wire on them, is that used to collect casualty beads? If so, I think I like the idea better than a dice box.

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    1. Norm, yes all bases have a post for casualty beads on one side and glued on beads to indicate troop type. (red=heavy, green=light etc). The first time I saw them they seemed a bit gaudy but now I barely notice them and they are darned handy for identifying units and tracking status.

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  2. Punic Wars, always splendid! And your photos are great, beautiful lines of troops Ross!

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    1. I agree Phil. A table full of 25mm troops and a conclusion in less than 3 hours. I will pass your compliment

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  3. Command & Colors Ancients with miniatures; a perfect game!

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    1. well, a good one with the right crowd at least :)

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  4. Ross Mac,

    I like the wire posts for collecting casualty markers and the use of coloured beads to indicate unit quality. An idea worth copying.

    As to the elephant ... well no decent Ancient army should be without one. (And when will elephants be appearing in Atlantica? Great for pulling heavy artillery in difficult Colonial terrain ... or for carrying Gatling guns as shown in that wonderful film, 'Gunga Din'.

    All the best,

    Bob

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    1. The posts do keep the beads in place. The unit type coloured coded to the game was a good idea, a painted strip on the back instead would make a neat sort of hidden id to test how well your opponent knows his foe by looking at the uniforms, arms and armour.

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  5. I totally endorse Bob's comment. Atlantica must have elephants! Like artillery, they bring dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl.

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