EXCERPT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Tramp, tramp, tramp


General Kinch consults his staff as his 2nd Division marches to the battlefield.

Well, its hot out and the table was all set up and ...well, what did you expect? I was going to squeeze a Charge! game in but its been nearly a year since the ACW  boys have been out. I still have a hungering to use the little guys to fight bigger battles than my bigger figures do,  (There's an equation in there somewhere.) so I revisited my plans to use 6ish stand Brigades as units and decided to rewrite the rules a bit to include some Featherstonian influences which somehow turned into Charge! influences, not to mention OTR and BOFF. At any rate the revised rules look like this: a Plastic Army of the Potomic.

The Yankees storm the hill with 2:1 odds while detaching a Division to hold up Reb reinforcements.
In a nutshell, variable length moves with a command roll if not "in command". The Side with initiative moves first, then the other, then shooting is simultaneous then charges are resolved. Broken units may be rallied and recover up to 1/2 stands if successful. Very quick and easy, not a lot of low level detail but lots of room for special unit rules and  similar sorts of tinkering.

OK, the first attack did not succeed as well as the Yankee commander had hoped but Reb casualties had been heavy and their reinforcements have not broken through the Zouave roadblock yet
At first I thought it was too fast and deadly but lo and behold it was turn 13 out of 15 when the Rebs morale broke and had been a ding dong fight lasting at least an hour if not more. I think that I will be able to use more figures now should I paint them up.
Second try was a charm and the inevitable counter attack was repulsed. The Rebs are done for today.
OK, back to the painting desk!

14 comments:

  1. Great memories. Great figures. Love the civil war figs.

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  2. Your games are always inspirational. Now you have me thinking of how I could base my Airfix ACW figures, so I could ether use them on bases of for Little Wars.

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  3. Lovely photos Ross of wonderful figures as usual, been a long time since I heard 'Tramp, Tramp, Tramp' a Civil war marching song I believe? I came very close to buying Andy Copestakes fine 40mm ACW collection, but on top of the Napoleonics It was too much of a financial stretch, but I keep thinking about them :)

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    1. It was a well known Civil War song but few know there was a Canadian version written during the Fenian raids. https://youtu.be/6P_nVQ7f1yM

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  4. Lovely figures - nice to see them in action again. Tramp, tramp - so much more positive than Trump, Trump.

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  5. Love the photo of the Confederate column - the rules look interesting too!

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  6. Good lord, how much stuff have you got tucked away? ;)

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    1. These guys aren't tucked away, they get out at least once a year! :)
      All I can really say is that over the last 10 years, I have sold or given away more, possibly twice as many more, painted figures as I still have, but that included 15mm armies for both sides for ....8? 9? wars? as well as a 25's, 40's and 54's. So what's left really doesn't seem like much!

      At least most of what is left is on display and gets out for a game at least once a year, most years.

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  7. I am always drawn to pics of Airfix ACW armies. Nice little action, too. That leading picture put me in mind of the military paintings of Davis - so much so that it took a closer look to discover that I was looking at a Confederate column, not Napoleonic French one!

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