EXERT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Sunday, December 4, 2011

Hearts of Ten (mm)

The Highwater mark of the Battle. On Turn 2 my cavalry arrives and seizes the Central Hill.

On Saturday I accepted an invitation to give the latest rendition of Hearts of Tin an outing with Lentulus's 10mm mid-18thC armies.  I won't bore every one with minor details of how the battle went like what happened to my cavalry in between the picture above and the one below. Amazing though how 10mm cavalry look so much farther away than they really are? Who knew that if I went first and wheeled to face the unseen brigade on my left, but had 1 unit refuse orders, and his cavalry then advanced a full move, that  they would be within charge reach and if they won the initiative on the next turn that they could charge my flank before I could finish my careless fancy maneuver? Who wrote these rules anyway? 

Lentulus has posted  a battle report and more pictures  here.
Mind you, there was still hope at this point in time. It takes more than 1 blunder and a few unlucky/luckily rolls to lose a game of Hearts of Tin.

I was pleased once again with how the rules played. (actually these were quite close to what we used last time, only my own troops having been subjected to the intervening wilderness wanderings,) I did find one or two more unwritten or improperly written rules and 1 or 2 minor tweaks suggested themselves during play (for example, as I suspected during my last ACW outing, allowing the artillery 2 dice instead of 1 has made them too powerful). These have now been incorporated and  Google Docs   has been updated as per the link to the left.


But, I was up to the task. Two more blunders, more smart maneuvering by my foe  and some very average dice later.....       
Another fine army destroyed..  





8 comments:

  1. Army destroyed?

    Not at all. It's amazing how many soldiers will rejoin the colors tomorrow when they are lead by a General they respect.

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  2. The 10mm figures do look plausible against the tabletop landscape, it's just a pity they have to be on such thick bases; I assume this is so they can actually be picked up and moved around, otherwise there would be nothing much for the fingers to grip.

    Pleased to hear the rules worked so well.

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  3. Dave, I'm sure you're right, but we may never know what'll they'd do for a general they respect. Luckily the Provosts are doing a good job of rounding up stragglers.

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  4. Wargaming Dave, the bases do make it easier to pick them up and Les has affixed labels to the back of the base to identify the Regiment and battalion for each stand. A god sent for me when sorting troops.

    Having said that, I don't notice the bases don't seem as prominent in person as they do in some pictures. Possibly a side effect of looking down on them from above.

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  5. Thanks Rodger, I'll pass that on.

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  6. Ross

    Lovely looking game - almost enough to sell one on 10mms if it wasn't for my failing eyesight!

    PD

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  7. Peter, I can almost tell which are units which when I hold them up to within an inch of my nose. but when I get them there they are pretty.

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