EXCERPT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Monday, November 20, 2017

Retreating Around the Enemy

In keeping with my mini-campaign hopes I decided that the next game should be some form of rearguard action as the Fenian forces fall back towards the border. It was at this  point that I realized that they had been attacking from the East in the last game so I decided to shift the axis 90 degrees and see how the offset squares feel when going along the grain rather than against it.

So here they are retreating south, across the Yamaska and towards Iron Hill. 
Run! Run for the Hills! The Redcoats are coming!
Please don't bother google mapping to see if the geography is accurate in any but the broadest sense of Iron Hill  being between the Yamaska and the US Border, the terrain is straight out of One Hour Wargames, Scenario 20 . (See Incident at Rocky Top Hill from 2016) .

The rugged high ground at the southern edge is actually off table as is the barely visible Major Denison with the Anglo-Canadian forces.


6 comments:

  1. It will be interesting to see how the game works for your offset squares on a different axis. Do you have to worry about facing in the rules? If so, do they fit ok with the offset squares?

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    1. The bottom line is that facing matters but that I'm pretty liberal about allowing otherwise unengaged units to react as well as allowing units to change facing and fire. I'm still winging it though and judging situations as they arise. Once I'm comfortable I'll have to see if it can be put into words.

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  2. I do like the table with offset squares. It seems to have the semi-cultivated look of the squares, but with less formality about it. From an aesthetic point of view it is probably the best grid system of the lot!

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    1. So far it looks less "in your face" than the square grid and seems to be working well.

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    2. ps One of the best things is that I can drive a road straight across the table along either axis or can make a straight road appear to curve back and forth without the actual distance changing.

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  3. I agree with Archduke Piccolo, the board looks more aesthetically pleasing. I will have to remark out one of my chessboards and give it a try. Thankyou for sharing such a visual example.

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