EXCERPT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Thursday, July 4, 2019

Rebel Incursion in the Blue River Valley!


TROOP TRAIN AMBUSHED! 
Dominion government blames Origawn Rebels for Blue River Incursion and urges calm.

MILITIA MOBILISATION BILL INTRODUCED IN PARLIAMENT

AMBUSHED!
Our correspondent Russell Williams has filed this report from Hastee Junction in the Blue River District.
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It was late on the first when we rounded the bend and caught out first glance of Hastee Junction since we had passed through last fall to fight the Rebels. The optomists among us hoped we would take the lefthand track to pass through Brooklyn with perhaps a day's leave for those with family in that County but I felt sure that we would go right, up past Sloy Lake to take the Moose Bay Ferry.

There was a good crowd gathered at the station which was unusual but we put that down to Dominion Day celebrations. Our hopes were high that we would be allowed to disembark and join the celebrations before continuing on.  Those hopes were soon shattered by a storm of rifle bullets from the hills on both sides as well as from straight ahead.
The Regulars storm the hill while Mr. Williams sketches the action from the safety of the armoured wagon.  
At first we were bewildered, this was supposed to be safe territory. Was this a Rebel Cavalry raid? The heavy, accurate fire which was causing heavy casualties suggested something more. Regardless of who was firing, we fired back with a vengeance.  Eventually we were able to identify Kree warriors to our left, a party of Hunters as they are commonly called to our right and Voltiguers from the Origawn Rebel army to our front! This latter was a disturbing sight since they were raised largely from descendents of the Blue River Rebels who had fled to the Origawn. That they appeared to be accompanied by some sort of militia and led by someone with a striking resemblance to the Member for the riding was especially disturbing. The suggestion of an alliance between these three rebel groups was even more alarming!

Since the long range duel was getting us nowhere, and the naval gun in front of the train was ssuffering from the accurate fire of the Voltigeurs,  Brigadier Ross ordered the infantry to detrain and assault the hill to the right while the train backed out of rifle range.
The Sappers and Victoria Rifles go in with cold steel. 
After a fierce fight with heavy losses the hill was taken while the artillery fire scattered the militia holding the station. Forward came the Regulars but the Voltigeurs were faster and closer. From the cover of the buildings they cut down the first rush with deadly fire.  The remaining Regulars were ordered back to the train to support the naval gun and the Rifles and Sappers went in with the Brigadier at their head. 

The fall of the Brave Brigadier Ross.
Alas, the sharp eyes of the veteran Voltigeurs did not fail them. The Rifles and Voltigeurs suffered heavily and when a shot struck the unfortunate Brigadier, they broke to the rear. Their officers soon rallied them but a hasty council of war led to a decison to embark as many wounded as possible and retreat down the line to await reinforcements.

It was a bitter night but with wounds bound up and a squadron of the Bodyguard and a battery of artillery on hand, the combined force approached the Junction ready to fight. The enemy however was gone. To everyone's great relief the wounded, including the Brigadier,  had been left in the care of the local citizens as the rebels dispersed, leaving a sealed letter to be delivered to the Prime Minister. The locals claimed no knowledge of who any of the Rebels were but insisted that the Rebel had also suffered heavily and had been on the point of withdrawing when the final charge went in.

I have a feeling that the Blue River Valley has not seen the end of war.

14 comments:

  1. An excellent brush up! Once again we have ungrateful colonists acting out on July 4th.... A sad day, indeed, for the cause of civility and union.

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    1. Well at least they were well mannered and civil once the fighting stopped. You can get a long with people like that.

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  2. A dastardly episode: a punitive expedition is called for!

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    1. Ross Mac,

      I trust that the government will not be too tardy in dealing with this situation. Act fast and hit hard!

      All the best,

      Bob

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    2. More toy soldiers might be needed.....

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  3. Up the rebels!
    Um, I mean, nice report!

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  4. Hi Ross- an interesting Battle there and well written coverage of the action. The ambush was part successful for the Rebels as they lay await in the town for the perfect moment. Cheers. KEV.

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  5. The best part is that they all stand up at then end.

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    1. Well, except for one rifleman who was finally found lying under the table on the morning after.

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    2. Did he break into come alcohol stores during the battle?

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    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    4. During the battle? Unthinkable. Afterwards...well, perhaps a little too much medicinal brandy may have been offered by the kind townspeople.

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