EXCERPT FROM APPENDIX 1 from Don Featherstone's Battles With Model Soldiers
(The book that got me started.)

"Nothing in these pages is a dictate, no word says you must or you shall do it this way. On the contrary, the book sets out from the very beginning to stimulate the reader to think for himself, and to use what he has read merely as a foundation for efforts and ideas which reflect his own temperament and character. Only in this way will he obtain maximum satisfaction from the hobby of battling with model soldiers."

-Don Featherstone 1918 - 2013

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

100 Years Ago Today- The Haxifax Explosion

Halifax Before
Picture from Wiki

On the 6th of December 1917 the SS Mont Blanc, loaded with TNT, Pitric Acid, Benzole and Gun Cotton, collided with the SS Emo at the narrowest part of Halifax harbour. The resulting explosion was the largest man made explosion prior to Hiroshima

After. (Picture from Wiki article)
"Over 1,600 people were killed instantly and 9,000 were injured, more than 300 of whom later died.[24] Every building within a 2.6-kilometre (1.6 mi) radius, over 12,000 in total, was destroyed or badly damaged. The shock waves were felt 200 km away. "  (Extract from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_Explosion

Nature with its usual sense of humour dumped 40 cm of snow on the city the next day as relief efforts were getting into high gear.



14 comments:

  1. I must confess I had not heard of this tragedy, it is almost unbelievable.

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  2. Well I've never heard of this disaster , shows how limited our popular knowledge is .

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    1. Cambrai was just wrapping up, news from France probably had precedence.

      Made the Dec 7th papers in Honalulu but by Dec 7 '41 they'd forgotten all about it.

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  3. By that first night, Massachusetts dispatched a train with supplies and a medical unit to aid in the City's relief. It arrived on the 8th, after being held up by a snowstorm. To this day, Nova Scotia sends Boston a Christmas tree in gratitude for Massachusetts quick response. One act that makes me proud to be from Massachusetts.

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    1. and rightly so Mind you I've been reminded that the free trees only started in '71. Hopefully a late thank you is better than none.

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  4. I've been to Halifax at least thee times, and recall seeing photos and accounts of this disaster in the museum there. Horrific!

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    1. The stories about how well the people handled it and how quickly they turned their efforts towards "getting on" with things are what amaze me most.

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  5. I'd never heard of this until visiting Halifax a few years ago. A nice city with nice people, which made learning about it even more sad.

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    1. War has long arms and a hundred years wasn't as long ago as it seems these days. There are still a few living survivors though they were very young at the time.

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  6. I'd never heard of this either but I guess you're right it would have been buried somewhat in the UK under news from the western front.

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    1. Actually I was teasing, my undertstanding is that it was well reported at the time but it was a long tome ago and far away. Even growing up as close as Montreal I wasn't really aware of it though it was probably mentioned in passing in a history or somewhere. Its remembered here though!

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  7. I'd never heard of this either. Who needs enemy action with incidents like this?

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    1. Indeed, "A French ship, a Norwegian ship and a Canadian harbour pilot meet in a harbour..."

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